Campus Life

The Authentic Pastry Bowl

  In 1912, pastry bowls were made of nickel, plate and copper. What makes this a truly fascinating artefact is that its appearance today is vastly different from that of 1912. The floor of the Atlantic Ocean where the Titanic came to rest is covered in an acidic sediment which has created a red and orange ring inside the bowl. This offers us an idea of the passage of time and the ephemeral nature of man-made...

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Titanic Beers and Champagne Bottles

  The Titanic’s ship’s manifest tell us that the grand vessel left from Southampton dock with over 20000 bottles of wine, beer and the liquor. Included here are 4 of the bottles salvaged from the wreckage. Despite their corks having been depressed by water-pressure, these bottles represent a view through the looking glass at the lavish lifestyles of the first-class...

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Seawater Taps

  Passengers aboard the Titanic had the choice between ocean-water taps and fresh-water taps, each with hot and cold settings. These taps were manufactured in the early 20th century by Dalton co. If you used salt water, a bucket of fresh water would be provided to rinse off the salt after bathing. Passengers who could not afford a bathroom in their quarters had to pay an extra fee to book a bathroom. The Titanic was luxurious for the wealthy classes, but the lower decks had a vastly different experience, which demonstrates the class-consciousness of the...

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The Titanic Deck Bench

  The deck benches aboard the Titanic were intended to give the passengers panoramic views of the Atlantic ocean as the vessel sailed by. The benches were constructed with 3 elaborate supports, bolted to deck in case of rough seas, with wooden slats making up the seating. This particular example is bent: either from the destruction of the ship itself or from underwater pressure – a physical example of the destructive force involved in the...

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The Porthole Window

  This porthole window frame (one of 0ver 2000) is completely bent from the sinking of the Titanic. The one inch thick glass window is gone, along with the rivets, swallowed by the depths of the North Atlantic. Passengers of a certain class would have had porthole windows in their cabins, giving them the opportunity to gaze in wonder at the vast expanse of ocean surrounding them, or marvel at the waves hitting the ship’s sides in stormy...

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Worker Rivets

  The very same rivets which were used to secure the porthole windows were also used elsewhere in the ship. The ship was built by hand and took over three years to build. The workers who fastened the rivets did not have protective gear and had to pop rivets for 12 hours per day. The Titanic honoured the wealthy and famous, but also stands as a reminder of the hands that built it and the conditions they had to...

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The Elaborate Chamber Pots

  In 1912, not even all of the first-class passengers had the luxury of a flushing toilet. Instead, these elaborate chamber pots were provided for the passengers. Owing to the nature of transatlantic voyage, the chamber pots were nicknamed ‘vomit pots’, by seasick travellers. Legend has it that when the shop began to sink some women carried their chamber pots to the lifeboats, worried that they might get...

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